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BuckleyGrayYeoman champions the reuse of existing buildings in Eccleston Yards

Eccleston Yards BuckleyGrayYeoman Photo © Matt Chisnall

Eccleston Yards redevelops a previously derelict and underutilised car park between Victoria and Belgravia. The project by architects BuckleyGrayYeoman involves the refurbishment of five existing buildings at ground level which are opened up into nineteen retail and gallery spaces, as well as the creation of a new public courtyard and the placement of new pedestrian routes to connect with neighbouring streets.

The scheme, on behalf of Grosvenor Britain & Ireland, repairs the urban fabric and creates an energetic co-working hub for visitors and creative talent that champions the reuse of existing buildings in London.

Eccleston Yards BuckleyGrayYeoman Photo © Matt Chisnall
Eccleston Yards BuckleyGrayYeoman Photo © Matt Chisnall

Eccleston Yards comprises the sensitive refurbishment of a former power station and coal store. Spread over four buildings and clustered around a central courtyard, BuckleyGrayYeoman has created an authentic identity for the scheme by retaining the original character of the buildings and referencing its rich heritage throughout.

The open space in the centre, which we now recognise as the courtyard, was previously a closed and dormant site with no public access. Activation of the streetscape has been made possible with retail units at ground level and the introduction of the landscaped courtyard, which provides a new public space for outdoor events. The creation of a new pedestrian route from Ebury Street into the landscaped courtyard allows increased permeability into the site and is the heart of the new community of Eccleston Yards.

Eccleston Yards BuckleyGrayYeoman Photo © Matt Chisnall
Eccleston Yards BuckleyGrayYeoman Photo © Matt Chisnall

To build upon the existing character of the individual buildings, material finishes of timber and metal have been selected to create a mix of traditional and contemporary aesthetics, while a bronze finish to the ironmongery runs through the site to provide continuity. Metal louvres have been incorporated in the retail units.

BuckleyGrayYeoman’s regeneration and authentic transformation of the site has drawn diverse and eclectic brands, adding to the character of the place, while connecting with the local communities and visitors alike.

Eccleston Yards BuckleyGrayYeoman Photo © Matt Chisnall
Eccleston Yards BuckleyGrayYeoman Photo © Matt Chisnall

Andrew Henriques, Director of BuckleyGrayYeoman:

“Our objective for this project was to transform and regenerate a derelict and underused site within the Grosvenor Estate and create a new destination for Central London. 

Eccleston Yards now provides a new and thriving hub for creative businesses such as independent restaurants, fashion retailers, co-working and wellbeing for residents and visitors to Victoria and Belgravia.”

Eccleston Yards BuckleyGrayYeoman Photo © Matt Chisnall
Eccleston Yards BuckleyGrayYeoman Photo © Matt Chisnall

Planners in the City of Westminster have also granted planning consent for the renovation of a former ice factory at 27 Eccleston Place.

The renovation of 27 Eccleston Place will add 30,000 sq. ft. of workspace, retail space and two new restaurants next to Eccleston Yards and provides workspace, studios and retail units tailored to independent businesses, entrepreneurs and creative talent. 

27 Eccleston Place
Planners in the City of Westminster have granted planning consent for the renovation of a former ice factory at 27 Eccleston Place, next to Eccleston Yards

Andrew Henriques, Director at BuckleyGrayYeoman said, 

“27 Eccleston Place is a handsome and resilient building that has already been through incarnations as a power station, an ice factory and a garage. It’s fantastic to be converting it to a new use and to write the next chapter in its near 200-year history.” 

“The new building will be a major addition to the work we’ve already completed to make Eccleston Yards a destination for creative independent businesses.” 

“The character of this building evolved over decades through a process of addition and adaption, of use and reuse. Our design celebrates the historic fabric of the building, adding to it in a way that feels legible to future generations but also of a piece with the rest of the construction and in a way that takes advantage of the technical possibilities of our own time.” 

27 Eccleston Place was built in 1830 as an ice factory and in its near 200-year history has been adapted as a coachworks, a power station and most recently a garage. 

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