Krasnodar Stadium

Krasnodar Stadium, in southern European Russia, is nicknamed Krasnodar Coliseum due to its classical external structure, which is divided into different levels and characterised by columns at regular intervals reminiscent of the Coliseum in Rome.

The ultramodern, technological atmosphere of the interior, which covers a total area of 116,248 sq m, designed by Maxim Rymar architectural studio, contrasts with the more classical architecture designed by Gerkan, Marg and Partners (gmp), which resembles an ancient amphitheatre supported by Italian travertine columns.

Krasnodar Stadium, Russia, Delta Light

The exceptions to this classical style are the cutting-edge roof and the high-resolution, 4,700 sq m video screen installed along the edge of the stands. The idea was to create a place similar to a theatre that could host sensational matches and competitions. With their solemn, yet welcoming appearance, the atriums resemble the foyers. The stone cladding of the external façade continues inside, featuring the same type of stone with more delicate, varied workmanship.

In the halls in front of the central desks, the walls are lined with massive raw travertine blocks that are reflected in the mirrored ceiling, recalling the solemn atmosphere of a museum. The other walls, which surround green poufs and chairs, are clad with wooden slats. As you approach the arena itself, the finishes become more precise and modern, such as the small hexagons covering the columns, which resemble the design of a football, produced using a special process that creates curved, embossed surfaces.

Krasnodar Stadium, Russia, Delta Light

Visitors who enter for the first time immediately notice the stadium’s close bond with the team: the dominant shades in the stadium are white, black and green (lamps and furniture), the colours of the Russian city’s team, FC Krasnodar. In addition to the interior’s emphasis on the link with the team, the architects also focused on the functionality of the facility and the resilience of its materials, given the large number of people it will host (it has a capacity of 33,000 spectators).

Krasnodar Stadium, Russia, Delta Light

Fashionable materials were avoided and instead travertine was chosen, a classic stone that is definitely more resistant to wear and tear. The architects wanted fans to experience the interior in a fresh, new state every time that they enter, which can be up to thirty times a year. The challenge, for example, was to create welcoming environments, like restaurants, cafés and lobbies, even in areas where there is no natural light, eliminating the oppressive sense of being enclosed due to the absence of a view outside.

Krasnodar Stadium, Russia, Delta Light

Krasnodar Stadium, Russia, Delta Light

Krasnodar Stadium, Russia, Delta Light

Lighting plays an important role in this building: it is present, but not obviously noticeable. It is not the type of lighting that dominates the environment, overshadowing everything else: it is “pure” light without too many decorative elements, ensuring that the focus is on the architecture and spaces. Delta Light provided custom-designed equipment that meets all the stadium’s requirements and standards, creating appropriately-lit areas without detracting from visitor’s overall perception of the interior.

Krasnodar Stadium, Russia, Delta Light

The two most important areas inside a stadium are the mix zone and locker rooms. The first is bright and harmonious thanks to the finish materials and the lighting, which creates the right rhythm. The locker rooms are special places where athletes prepare for their matches, talk to each other and experience the last moments before going onto the pitch. This space, which is also called “Holy of Holies” (the most sacred area of the Tabernacle), has a rigorous look with furniture and finishes in wood, metal and acrylic. Everything is designed to promote maximum concentration and energy before a match.

Krasnodar Stadium, Russia, Delta Light

Krasnodar Stadium, Russia, Delta Light

 


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